Part Three: Essential Fatty Acids and the Omega-6: Omega-3 Ratio

By Carrie Rutledge, Nutrition Therapist Master 

 

Vegetable Oils and Chronic Inflammation

Essential fatty acids are essential because we must get them through our diet. Omega-6 (LA-

linoleic acid and Arachidonic Acid) and Omega-3 (ALA-alpha-linolenic acid) are imperative to great skin health. ALA needs to be converted in the body to EPA and DHA to be used effectively. Linoleic acid is needed for the inflammatory response and ALA is important for reducing inflammation. It is important to keep these fatty acids in balance to avoid chronic inflammatory disease. Because eczema is an inflammatory condition, it is crucial to make sure these fatty acids are kept at a ratio of 4:1.

In the last 100 years, the ratio of these essential fatty acids has increased in favor of Omega-6 to between 10-20: This ratio predisposes us to chronic inflammatory conditions and allergies. Americans are overconsuming LA mainly from industrial seed oils such as canola oil, sunflower oil, corn oil and soybean oil. Seed oils go through a refining process that requires degumming, deodorizing, and bleaching to make them edible and nearly all restaurants in the United States use them for cooking. Furthermore, studies show that polyunsaturated rich vegetable oils increase the risk of lifestyle diseases such as, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, and obesity. 

Supplementation of Omega3 fatty acids in pregnancy is a necessity for reducing allergic diseases in offspring. In fact, women who supplement with 3,700mg per day of EPA and DHA at 25 weeks’ gestation until 3-4 months of breastfeeding, reduce risk of food related eczema by three-fold. Therefore, ensuring an optimal Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio before the fetal immune system develops could be an important step to preventing allergic diseases such as asthma and food allergies in children. 4

 

3 Steps to Bring the Omega-6: Omega-3 Ratio Back to Balance

 

Stop cooking with vegetable oils and eating in restaurants that use them

Vegetable oils are highly processed and go through refining which often involves removing essential nutrients and chemical extraction including bleaching. Refining is done to maintain shelf life; however, most of the nutritional elements are lost during this process and these oils tend to oxidize during the heating process. Unfortunately, most restaurants use these oils for frying and cooking at high temperatures.

The best oils for cooking at high heats are saturated because the chemical structure of saturated fats has each carbon molecule saturated with hydrogen; therefore, it won’t become oxidized when heated. Hence, the more unsaturated a fat is the faster the oxidation reaction proceeds. Coconut oil, butter, ghee, lard, and beef tallow are all solid at room temperature and can remain stable when heated above 180 degrees. The chemical structure of saturated fats has each carbon molecule saturated with hydrogen; therefore, it won’t become oxidized when heated.

Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil, avocado oil, flaxseed oil, chicken and duck fats are liquid at room temperature and should not be used to cook over 180 degrees as they will begin to smoke and oxidize (or loss of electrons and an increase of the oxidation state). These types of oils are great for cooking low and slow or used in dressings. 

Finding restaurants that cook with healthy oils in the United States is getting easier. Using the Seed Oil Scout app is a great way to find farm to table restaurants that are cooking with healthy oils. Choosing menu items that are unlikely to be fried or cooked in oils and reviewing the menu before eating out is a good way to navigate the menu when traveling.

 

Add Omega-3 fatty acid foods to your diet including wild caught fish

We begin introducing foods to babies around six months. Some of the best advice I received

from my holistic pediatrician was to start with introducing fat and protein instead of grains and carbohydrates. This way babies begin to develop a taste for healthier, nutrient dense, non-processed foods. He advised us to start with avocados, salmon roe, sardines, and chicken liver.

To this day our daughter loves a wide variety of nutritious foods and is always willing to try something new. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for skin and brain health. In a recent study measuring serum EPA and DHA, results showed that over 68% of adults and 95% of children in the United States, do not consume enough Omega-3s to meet nutritional guidelines.6 Omega-3 fatty acids are tied to learning, behavior and a reduction in childhood allergies including asthma. 1,7 Omega-3 fatty acid foods to be included in the diet are:

  • Low mercury fish including wild-caught: Salmon, Anchovies, Crab, Sardines, Black Cod, Oysters, Shrimp, Trout and Arctic Cod. Wild caught fish are high in Omega-3 fatty acids because they eat algae. Farm raised fish are fed grains and soy and very high in Omega-6
  • Grass-fed beef, lamb or veal and pasture raised eggs
  • Walnuts, chia seeds and flax seeds (conversion rate to EPA and DHA is low)

 

Omega-6 fatty acids are still important to include in the diet, but they should come from whole

food sources as opposed to industrialized vegetable oil. Whole food sources of Omega-6 fatty

acids to include are:

  • Nuts and seeds
  • Pastured animals

 

Supplement to Increase Omega-3 Fatty Acids in the Diet

Scientific studies continue to show that supplementing with Omega-3 fatty acids can reduce the production of IgE, the antibodies that cause allergic symptoms in those with asthma. From all the immune cells investigated DHA and EPA have been shown to inhibit the activation of immune cells while promoting some more specific immune functions including destruction of abnormal cells. Furthermore, supplementation has benefits on the brain. Children with ADHD have

shown to have low levels of Omega-3 fatty acids in their cellular membranes correlated with learning and behavior problems. A study in Japan looked at 40 children with ADHD symptoms and supplemented with 510 mg of DHA and 100mg of EPA a day improved outcomes on combined teacher/parent ratings. More and more, studies are showing supplementation with EPA and DHA can improve a wide range of health disorders including Autism, Mood Disorder, Dementia, Dyspraxia, inflammatory issues, and improve brain function overall. 

  • Be sure to find a quality Omega-3 fatty acid supplement and store in the refrigerator
  • Choose one that is third party tested and free from heavy metals
  • The supplement should contain at least 500 mg of EPA and DHA per 1,000mg of fish oil
  • Vegans can supplement with a quality algae supplement such as Juice Plus

Lowering the Omega-6: Omega-3 ratio is imperative for the long-term health of our children. The benefits of eating and supplementing with EPA and DHA are widely known. From lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease, asthma, mast cell activation, autoimmune disease, diabetes, dementia, and eczema; it is crucial to begin making this change in your diet for the long-term health of your family.

If you would like to learn more about healing your body through nutrition and lifestyle, please contact me at carrie.rutledge@longevityhealthcenter.com and set up a free consultation to see how we can tailor a plan for you. 

 

Part 2: Gut Permeability and Chronic Inflammation 

By Carrie Rutledge, Nutrition Therapist Master 

 

Gut Permeability and The Immune Response  

Hippocrates once said that “All disease begins in the gut”. Studies are increasingly showing that eczema  and gut health are linked and when there is an imbalance of gut or skin flora, we now have an  inflammatory condition called dysbiosis. This occurs when there are too many pathogenic species, not  enough commensal species, and not enough diversity of species. Hence, if you want to heal the skin; you  must heal the gut.  

Gut permeability is a theory that explores intestinal permeability or impairment as a cause of letting  toxins into the bloodstream and as a result, an inflammatory response occurs. Our intestinal barrier  performs many critical functions, most importantly, regulating the absorption of nutrients from the gut  into the blood while preventing the entry of toxins and microorganisms.  

The digestive tract is considered outside the body as both openings of the digestive tract are connected to  the outside world. A strong, robust immune system in the GI tract will prevent these pathogens from  entering the bloodstream. In fact, 70-80% of all immune cells are found in the GI tract ready to fend off  the multitude of pathogenic organisms that enter our body every day. 

The digestive tract has a unique job of killing off the pathogenic bacteria while protecting commensal  bacteria and antigens which can induce an immune response. IgA antibodies (SIgA) are important for immunotolerance or the immune system’s ability to stay unresponsive to substances that would otherwise  elicit an immune response. They can also prevent mass bacteria invasion and intercept invaders that have  passed into the intestinal barrier. The microbiome and IgA antibodies have a synergistic relationship as  commensal bacteria are an important facilitator of IgA and probiotic supplementation has shown to  increase IgA production. 4Low IgA is associated with an increase in allergies, eczema, asthma, food  intolerance, UTI infections and gut dysbiosis (imbalance between pathogenic and commensal bacteria).  Therefore, if we are seeing these symptoms in ourselves or our children, we can begin taking steps to heal  and seal our gut to decrease the inflammatory response.  

 

Healing and Sealing the Gut with the 5R Approach 

Step 1: The Removal Process 

The removal process consists of getting rid of food items and environmental allergens that are causing toxicity.  Finding food intolerances can be tricky; therefore, a more expensive approach is to go through food sensitivity  testing and to strictly avoid those foods. You can also do an elimination diet in which you remove the most  common allergens from your diet and gradually add them back in after four weeks. The most common allergens to  remove will be eggs, dairy, gluten, soy, legumes, nuts, and seeds. After four weeks you will introduce one new food  per week and keep track of your body’s response. If you notice a new symptom or previous symptom return, then  that food is not tolerable for your system. During the elimination period, acceptable foods include meat, all  vegetables expect nightshades, all fruits except citrus, organic white rice, and healthy fats except butter. Removing  toxic shampoos, pesticides (especially glyphosate) and sanitizers will also be important to healing the skin and gut  microbiome.  

The removal process also consists of removing parasites and fungal overgrowth. This can be done with food, herbs,  or supplements.  

Antimicrobial Foods and Herbs to be Added to the  Diet Daily  

  • Pumpkin seeds 
  • Coconut oil  
  • Raw Garlic 
  • Manuka Honey 
  • Thyme, Clove, Rosemary, and Ginger

Anti-Parasitic Tea Recipe:  

Ingredients:

  • 1 Teaspoon Clove
  • 1 Cinnamon Stick
  • 1 Sprig of  Rosemary
  • 1 Teaspoon of fresh Ginger  

Instructions: Boil all ingredients in purified water for 30  minutes 

 

Step 2: Replace the Digestive Enzymes that May be lacking from Gut Dysbiosis  

Once we start to remove foods, toxins and parasites that are causing dysbiosis, we need to start replacing enzymes, vitamins, and minerals for optimal digestive function. For those with heartburn you may not be producing enough  hydrochloric acid or HCL, therefore, you may need to supplement as the digestive tract heals. Ox Bile (if you have  had your gallbladder removed) is good for supporting the liver and digestion of fats and adding in protease, lipase  and amylase will help break down the nutrient dense foods you are now eating. 

 

Foods That Increase Stomach Acid: 

  • Apple cider vinegar  
  • Celery juice  
  • Sauerkraut juice  
  • Bitters-stimulates HCL, pancreatic enzymes and bile production 
  • Warm lemon water, dandelion root tea or ginger tea with meal

 

Foods that Contain Digestive Enzymes 

  • Honey (amylase and protease)  
  • Ginger (contains protease)  
  • Kimchi (contains lipase, protease, and amylase)  
  • Mango (amylase)  
  • Papaya (protease)  
  • Avocado (lipase)  
  • Pineapple (bromelain, protease)  

 

Step 3: Replacing the Gut with Probiotics and Prebiotic Foods to Increase  

Because eczema is an inflammatory disease, our goal in treating the root cause is to lower inflammation internally.  Once we have removed pathogenic bacteria and replaced nutrients and enzymes for proper digestion, we want to  begin replacing the commensal bacteria with probiotic rich foods and supplements. As we begin to replace, we also  want to make sure we are feeding the microorganisms in the gut prebiotics. To qualify as a prebiotic a food must  benefit the commensal bacteria as well as benefit you, the host of the bacteria.  

Live Probiotic Foods to Include 

  • Unsweetened yogurt (if you can tolerate dairy add raw honey for sweetener)  
  • Sauerkraut (for babies you can give a tablespoon of juice daily or use as a salt substitute for  meats and vegetables)  
  • Kimchi, Pickled vegetables, Kombucha, or Kefir, Sourdough 

Prebiotic Foods to Include 

  • Beans, Lentils and Peas 
  • Raw Garlic  
  • Leeks  
  • Apples
  • Unripe Bananas  
  • Cooked and cooled potatoes or white rice

 

Step 4: Repairing the Lining of the Digestive Tract from Long-Term Inflammation 

To prevent toxins and foods from entering the blood stream, it is important to start repairing the mucosal lining of  the digestive tract. Two nutrients that help to restore gut health and the epithelial lining are L-Glutamine and  Glycine. Herbals to consider including in the diet to support a healthy digestive tract are Marshmallow Root,  Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice (DGL), and Slippery Elm.  

L-Glutamine: Is an amino acid that acts as a building block for protein. The body relies on L-Glutamine to   facilitate healing in conditions of severe metabolic stress, to reduce gastric inflammation, make  neurotransmitters, and repair muscles. It also serves in protecting the tight junctions of the gut. Dietary  glutamine is found in animal foods such as beef, chicken, pork, raw cheese, milk, and yogurt. A supplement  may also be necessary in cases of severe inflammation, poor gut health and lowered immunity. 5 

Glycine: Even though glycine is a non-essential amino acid, supplementation has been shown to reduce the  development of chronic inflammation and reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines. Glycine is synthesized in the  body from choline, threonine, and serine. Foods to incorporate to ensure adequate synthesis of glycine are  gelatin, bone broth, poultry skin, dried seaweed, wild caught salmon, and oxtail. 

Marshmallow Root: Marshmallow root has been shown to restore a protective lining around tight  junctions in the gut as well as treat irritated tissue in the mucous membranes. It is typically consumed  through a capsule or tea form and is often used for a wide range of digestive disorders including  constipation, colic, and heartburn. Marshmallow root has also been shown to treat atopic eczema. 

Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice (DGL): DGL has been shown to maintain and rebuild the intestinal lining of  the gut. In studies, DGL is shown to increase the protective mucus in the stomach and esophagus. and  protect the liver from nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. 

 Slippery Elm: Slippery elm is known for its anti-inflammatory properties and helps to form a protective  coating in the digestive tract. Studies show that when combined with Glycine, Aloe Vera, Pectin,  Peppermint Oil and Glutamine, individuals were able to reintroduce food triggers after 16 weeks of  consumption without provoking original symptoms. 

 

Gut Healing Recipes  

Bone Broth Recipe 

  • 1 chicken carcass or marrow bones 
  • 3 medium carrots 
  • 3 stalks of celery 
  • Fresh herbs 
  • Apple cider vinegar  
  • Keltic sea salt  

Directions: Roast the bones in the oven for 30-45 minutes. Take the bones and add to a dutch oven.  Add 2 Tsp of apple cider vinegar, vegetables fresh herbs and sea salt. Cover with filtered water and  bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 12-24 hours. After cooled, strain the broth into mason  jars. Use the broth to cook rice, soups, and stews.  

Jell-O Recipe  

2 cups of organic fresh juice 

2 TBSP of gelatin 

Raw honey 

1/2 -1 Cup of raw fruit or 2 TB of fruit rind (Optional)  

Directions: Pour juice into a saucepan and add 2 TBSP of gelatin and stir until it’s dissolved. Turn  on heat to medium and let simmer for 5-10 minutes. Turn off heat and let sit for 1 minute. Add in  honey and pour into a glass tray. Put into the refrigerator for 3-4 hours. 

 

Step 5: Rebalancing the Gut 

Rebalancing is all about following a healthy, long-term goal of reducing stress and supporting a healthy nervous  system. Studies show that genetics lay the groundwork for eczema, but it’s the environment that contributes to the  expression of the gene and both play a key role in the dysregulation of the nervous system as well as the immune  system. A dysfunctional nervous system can contribute to inflammation of the gut as well as the skin. In fact, recent  studies show that the skin is a target of the stress response. Psoriasis, mast cell activation, acne, and eczema have all  been tied to psychological stress, anxiety, and depression.

The 9 Essentials to Rebalancing your Life for a Healthy Happy Gut: 

  • Quality Sleep (Adults 7-8 hours, Teenagers 8-10 hours, Children 10-12 hours) 
  •  Food (make sure you sit down and avoid screens for your largest meal)  
  • Water (filtered from chlorine, pharmaceuticals, and fluoride)  
  • Exercise  
  • Healthy relationships  
  • Mental Health  
  • Spiritual Health 
  • Nature  
  • Have Fun  

Do Not Underestimate the Power of Relaxation

Modern American society is too focused on its definition of “success”. Our culture has us believing that success is  measured in achievement. It has us running from here to there, competing for this and that all to the detriment of our  health. Children today are pressured to perform at levels unseen in history. Driving from activity to activity and  rarely getting time to decompress. Being indoors all day and in front of screens has damaging effects on our  hormones, especially cortisol. With phones and computers contributing to increased cortisol and acting as a  psychological stressor, it is important to wean ourselves and our children off the addictiveness of the screen.  

Current studies are showing the power of mind-body therapies as treatment for many chronic diseases including  eczema. In fact, stress is the common risk factor for up to 90% of all diseases. When we are stressed, we release  more cortisol. High cortisol contributes to increased inflammation. 10,11 Therefore, it is important to practice  relaxation techniques. Whatever that looks like in your world, I encourage you to go outside, walk barefoot in the  grass, take day trips, explore, meditate, laugh, and have fun 

 

*If you would like to learn more about healing your body through nutrition and lifestyle, please contact me at carrierutledge@gmail.com and set up a free 15-minute consultation to see how we can tailor a plan for you.  

 

**Disclaimer: The information on this website has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any illness. I am a certified Nutritional Therapist Master practitioner, therefore, the information and material in this post is for informational purposes and not intended to treat, diagnose, or cure any illness. Please seek advice from a qualified medical professional regarding any medical condition or diagnosis.

 

Part 1: Lowering Inflammation

By Carrie Rutledge, Nutrition Therapist Master 

 

The “Why?” Behind this Series

I am the proud mother of a healthy five-year old girl who began struggling with Atopic Dermatitis, or Eczema, at 3 years of age. I approached this chronic inflammatory disease by exploring the root cause, instead of with topical steroid creams that may relieve symptoms but never address the fire inside. Although the Eczema took almost a year to heal (True healing is rarely a quick fix), with many setbacks, we have finally gotten to a place in which her body can withstand assaults and not break out into an itchy, uncomfortable rash. 

Over the course of this 4-part series, I will share with you my protocol for healing my daughter’s Eczema through diet, supplements, and herbs. Although there are other parts of the protocol that I will not cover, I will be giving you some wonderful tools to get you on your way to healthy skin. 

As always, everyone is biochemically different; however, my hopes are that this information will set the stage for recovery from a chronic inflammatory state. 

 

What is Eczema? 

According to the National Eczema Association, Eczema or Atopic Dermatitis is an inflammatory skin condition that causes dry skin, rashes, blisters, or skin infections and can leave someone at a higher risk for developing asthma or food allergies. The cause is unknown, but is attributed to genetics and environment, or epigenetics. Epigenetics is when our genes are “turned-on” by an environmental influence such as mold, heavy metals, fragrances, or chemicals.  Currently there is no “cure” for Eczema and can only be managed by avoiding triggers and using topical creams or immunosuppressants. 

My first question is: What is the “root cause”? As a nutritionist, I am always investigating the root cause. When my daughter was struggling with Eczema I asked myself, “Is it an allergy or an inability to detoxify appropriately?” “Is it because she was born via C-Section or because I had antibiotics when breastfeeding?” “Do we have a moldy house?”

I don’t subscribe to the idea that chronic disease happens by accident or purely through a genetic disposition. And if Eczema is an inflammatory condition, what is causing the inflammation?  We all want the best for our children, and my biggest concern for my daughter was Eczema turning into asthma. I was determined to heal this condition to the best of my ability, and not by masking it with long-term creams or steroids, but through a holistic means of nutrition and herbal supplements. 

 

The Top 4 Foods to Avoid When Combating Inflammation

When my daughter was 3, she broke out in a rash on the backs of her knees and in the creases of her arms. As a Nutritional Therapist I was already feeding her a healthy diet, so how could this happen? Was it even Eczema, or could it be some sort of allergy? I went down the rabbit hole into a year-long battle of getting a diagnosis, a prescription cream (or a band-aid if you will) and still no answers as to why my healthy child had inflammation of the skin. 

I quickly learned that Eczema is a chronic inflammatory skin condition and can range from mild to severe. There is no “cure” for Eczema, and experts are not aware of the cause, but they do believe it is a combination of genes and environmental triggers or epigenetics. The skin is the largest organ of the body and is involved in many important functions including protection from the external environment and as an excretory organ. That’s right, many of the toxins your body is harboring (heavy metals, pesticides, drugs, steroids, and cytokines) are excreted through the skin. For this reason, having healthy skin is going to require the body to be less toxic. 

Nutrition is of the utmost importance when healing Eczema. In fact, healing any skin condition requires a nutrient dense, whole-food diet. According to an eighteen-year study, the consumption of ultra-processed foods in America, consisting of fast food, ready-to-eat meals, sweets, salty snacks, canned soups, and breakfast cereals, has increased from an already high 53.5% in 2001 to 57% in 2017%.  Although my daughter did not eat an ultra-processed diet, she did eat many of the foods that would be under a list of common allergens such as, wheat, dairy, eggs, peanuts, and tree nuts, so I began the process of removing these foods from her diet. 

I do not suggest removing all the above foods at once, especially if you are trying to help a small child with Eczema. I am going to briefly touch on the four most important foods to eliminate when you are trying to bring down inflammation quickly. 

 

Gluten

Gluten intolerance and Celiac Disease is on the rise and has seen a drastic increase since 1990. The wheat grown in the United States has changed drastically in the last 70 years. We now grow a genetic variant called Semi-Dwarf wheat. This type of wheat is grown so that farmers can harvest more product in less time and under tough conditions. This may be why someone with a gluten sensitivity may have symptoms in the United States, but not in Europe. Furthermore, gluten upregulates Zonulin which is a protein that regulates the tight junctions or barrier in the cells of the gut. When the tight junctions of the gut become disturbed, the permeability of the gut lining allows for foods and toxins to pass into the bloodstream causing a whole host of problems. This is called “leaky gut” and can result in chronic inflammatory disease. 

I strongly recommend anyone with an inflammatory condition to remove gluten for at least ninety days. When you remove gluten, you will also be removing many processed foods and foods sprayed with pesticides, precisely glyphosate. The great news about removing gluten is it is extremely accessible to find healthier, gluten-free options. It should be noted that many gluten-free foods are still heavily processed; therefore, you will need to read labels thoroughly. 

 

Conventional Dairy

Not all dairy is created equal, and replacing dairy with a vegan beverage that is ultra-processed and high in oxalates isn’t the answer either. For this reason, it is important to choose your dairy wisely. Look for dairy in which the animal is pasture raised, organic and preferably raw. If we look to the French, who have diets high in saturated fats, but low incidences of chronic inflammatory disease, we learn that dairy stimulates an enzyme in the digestive tract called alkaline phosphatase (IAP) that is responsible for detoxifying lipopolysaccharides, a pro-inflammatory microbe.  Furthermore, dairy raised responsibly has a high nutritional value as it is a complete protein with vitamin A, D, folate B12 and butyrate which stimulates intestinal IAP. Butyrate plays an important role in the digestive tract by supplying the colon cells with energy lowering inflammation and supporting immunity. 

Dairy that is acceptable when targeting Eczema and inflammation would be imported raw cheese, raw milk from a local trusted farmer, and butter or ghee for cooking. In fact, pastured ghee and butter is a much better choice for cooking as opposed to vegetable oil because saturated fats are more stable to heat and are not prone to oxidation. If you do choose to avoid dairy altogether, I suggest making your own almond milk from organic almonds or finding a brand such as MALK that does not have synthetic gums, nutrients, or stabilizers. 

 

Artificial Dyes and Flavors

Last summer, I got my daughter’s Eczema under control and then she started pre-school. It wasn’t long until the Eczema showed up all over the back of her legs. The teacher sent a note home one day saying that my daughter couldn’t focus, not only that she was always crying within an hour of picking her up. I finally asked the teacher if they were giving her any food at school besides what I was sending in for snacks and was told students get a skittle every day when they leave the classroom. That alone was enough to send her into a skin flare up, as well as emotional outbursts. For this reason, I don’t budge when it comes to artificial dyes for my child. Not only are artificial dyes banned in Europe, but studies also show that they are linked to hyperactivity, hypersensitivity, and tumors in children.   Luckily, there are plenty of treats available that use safe ingredients for coloring. Some of my favorites are Giggles, Unreal, Black Forest Organic, Trader Joe’s Gourmet jellybeans, TruSweets Candy Canes, King Arthurs Frosting and YumEarth Organic Lollipops. 

 

Vegetable Oils 

When we want to know which oils to cook with, we can once again look to the French, who use lard, tallow, ghee, butter, and olive oil. The fact is, the French, Italians and Spanish are the biggest consumers of saturated fats, but are leading in health outcomes. In the U.S. vegetable oils have replaced butter, ghee, and animal fat as the most used cooking oil in the last century, and we have never been sicker. 

The refining process of vegetable oil is a process that requires bleaching, degumming, and deodorizing to make these oils edible. Studies show that cold-pressed vegetable oils contain pesticides, PCBs, and PAHs which are all considered to be hazardous chemical contaminants.  Furthermore, vegetable oils are high in omega-6 fatty acids which promote the inflammatory response. Studies show that reducing omega-6 fatty acids and increasing omega-3’s is effective in combating inflammation. Unfortunately, most Americans have a high ratio in favor of omega-6’s, which is associated with increased inflammation, allergies and autoimmune issues. 

Ways to reduce your omega-6 intake and increase your omega-3’s: 

  • Eat more wild-caught fish, including salmon, sardines, anchovies, scallops, shrimp, and bass.  
  • Plant-based sources such as flaxseeds, chia seeds, and walnuts are good, but not as bioavailable.
  • Avoid vegetable oils by cooking with animal fats, ghee, cold pressed olive oil, butter, and coconut oil. 
  • When eating out, use a restaurant tracker to find better choices such as Seed Oil Scout or Localfats.com, which will guide you toward restaurants that cook with healthy fats.
  • Avoid fast food whenever possible. 
  • When traveling, pack healthy snacks and research healthy restaurant options. 
  • Read labels for added fats such as canola oil, soybean oil, or sunflower oil. 
  • Buy pasture raised eggs and meats.
  • Take a quality Omega-3 supplement such as Barleans, Cod Liver Oil or OrthoMega. 

Keep in mind that healing from inflammation is not a quick fix. It takes patience and a dedicated commitment to looking and feeling better. If you begin by taking steps to eliminate gluten, conventional dairy, artificial dyes, and vegetable oils, you will begin to reduce the inflammatory load on the body and skin will begin to heal. 

 

Tune in for Part 2 of this series on Gut Permeability and Chronic Inflammation

 

By Mariela Amiri, Traditional Naturopath & Patient Coordinator

 

In part 1 of this series we dove into the world of parasites, looking at the types of organisms that can infect humans and the symptoms and havoc they can wreak in the body. Now let’s take a look at the holistic steps we can take to treat these infections and prevent these creepy crawlers from invading in the future. 

 

Bioenergetic Testing & Parasites

Bio energetic testing is a form of  testing that measures the energy frequencies of the body and looks for disturbances. It is used to detect many imbalances in the body including parasites. Bio energetic testing also customizes a more personalized approach to the client’s healing journey. We are all unique, so what works for one person may not work for the next. 

 

Parasites and the Detox Pathways 

Parasites hold onto, or “house” 6-8 times their weight in other toxins and  pathogens. They carry  mold, metals, Lyme pathogens,  viruses, pathogenic bacteria, retroviruses, chemicals, EMF and radiation! It is imperative for our detox pathways to be functioning properly in order to release parasites. 

When parasites poop, ammonia builds up and creates stagnation in our detox pathways, primarily in our lymphatic system. Once the lymphatic system gets congested, it will excrete build up wherever it can causing illnesses such as psoriasis, hives, acne, viruses etc. It’s super important to have those detox pathways working properly otherwise allergies, histamine intolerances, herxing and mast cell activation symptoms will occur.

 

Anti-parasitics To Detox and Support 

Here at Longevity, your practitioner can personalize a homeopathic remedy to detox from specific  parasites and give you drainage support. Certain homeopathics such as Drainage Tone will help detoxify and open up your detox pathways. Additionally, herbal remedies from Marco Pharma (Lymphonest, Bucco and Hepatica), will assist your liver, kidneys and lymphatic system in the detoxification process.  Binders such as GI Detox by Biocidin Botanicals or CellCore Biotoxin Binder (CellCore) are systemic binders that actually go into the  cells, glands, organs, tissues, blood, and mop up toxins such as  amonia (toxic byproduct of candida, yeast lyme, parasite and mold). 

Anti-parasitic herbs are essential for addressing parasites. We have various herbal combinations in our nutrition shop to choose from (both capsules and tinctures).

 

Supportive Detox Therapies for Parasites 

  • Coffee Enemas
  • Light Frequency
  • Ionic Foot Baths 
  • Ozone Rectal Insufflations 
  • PEMF 
  • Castor Oil Packs 
  • Detox Herbal Teas 
  • Electro-Lypmhatic Therapy 
  • HOCATT 

 

 

Parasites & Diet 

Parasites love to eat, therefore they rob our vital nutrients. They love to steal our vitamins and nutrients, creating major nutritional deficiencies, leading to a whole bunch of issues and chronic illnesses. 

Diet plays a huge role in keeping parasites at bay.  In order to eliminate parasites, one must reduce sugar, which is the primary food source for parasites. Parasites secrete enzymes that make you crave the exact foods that they want (sugar, refined carbs). It is also recommended to avoid dairy, pork, grains, alcohol and raw fish. Strong stomach acid is also very important when addressing parasites.

Interesting fact: the top dairy-loving parasites are Intestinal flukes, Tapeworms, Hookworms, and Roundworms.  

 

 

Anti-parasitic  Foods and Herbs                                  

  • Pumpkin seeds                                      
  • Beets                                                           
  • Raw Garlic                                                 
  • Carrots
  • Pomegranate 
  • Cinnamon
  • Clove 
  • Papaya
  • Turmeric 
  • Papaya seeds & honey mixture                   
  • Green Tea
  • Ginger 
  • Rosemary 
  • Cayenne Pepper 
  • Thyme
  • Coconut Oil                        
  • Pomegranates                      

 

Parasites & the Full Moon 

What does the lunar cycle have to do with the creepy crawlers inside our bodies? Your circadian rhythm is synced with the moon cycles. During a full moon, you produce less melatonin and  more serotonin. 

Parasites love this shift in biochemistry! Melatonin is the neurotransmitter that helps control your immune system and keep pathogens and parasites in check/balance. With a lack of melatonin down regulating the immune system and a spike in serotonin enabling parasite mobility it’s the perfect time to implement a parasite cleanse.

During a full moon parasites are extremely active & defend themselves by producing more biofilm. This is why some people experienced heightened symptoms during a full moon. All of this makes a full moon a perfect time to target them. 

Before doing a full moon parasite cleanse, make sure your detox pathways are working! It is equally important to optimize stomach acid, address biofilm. Once a parasite cleanse is done , a protocol to support the immune system and strengthen the gut is recommended. 

 

 

By Mariela Amiri, Traditional Naturopath & Patient Coordinator

 

Nobody likes to think about worms, amoebas, and other creepy crawlers living inside our bodies! But unfortunately, this is a very real and common health concern. In fact, parasitic infections are quite common in the United States, affecting millions of Americans through new or chronic infections. However, these diseases typically go undiagnosed due to lack of awareness among health care providers, as well as the relative inaccessibility or unavailability of the right diagnostic tests.

So let’s educate ourselves on this health issue to learn all about parasites, the havoc they can wreak in our systems, and the detoxification, nutritional, and lifestyle steps we can take to eliminate or prevent parasite infections in our households. 

 

What is a Parasite? 

A parasite is a plant or animal that lives upon or within another living organism at whose expense it obtains some advantage. Parasites include multi-celled and single-celled animals, fungi, and bacteria, and some include candida and viruses. Without a host, a parasite cannot live, grow, and multiply. For this reason, a parasite rarely kills its host, but it can spread diseases, ranging from the mildly annoying to the severe or even fatal.

 

Types of Parasites 

Roundworms are typically found in warmer climates but are common worldwide and can grow to about the size of a pencil. (Anclastomic, Ascaris, Dog heartworm, Pinworms, Strongyloides, Toxicara, Trichinella, Whipworm,)

Flatworms-Tapeworms Family (Bladder Worm, Beef Tapeworm, Dog tapeworm, Dwarf tapeworm, Fish tapeworm, Pork tapeworm, Rat Tapeworm) Infections from tapeworms usually occur from ingesting undercooked or raw meat or from contaminated food, water, soil, or hand to mouth contact. 

Flatworms- Fluke Family (Blood Flukes, Fish Flukes, Intestinal Flukes, Liver Flukes, Lymph Flukes, Pancreatic Flukes) 

Single-Cell Parasites (Amoebas, Anaplams, Babesia, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Giardia, Leishmaniasis, Neospora, Plasmodium, Sarcocystis, Spinal Fluid Parasites, Toxoplasma, Trichomonas)

 

What Are the Symptoms of a Parasite Infection? 

Parasites can negatively affect any part of the body and immune system. One can experience a range of  neurological symptoms, gastrointestinal symptoms, to inflammatory symptoms. There is a parasitical connection and neurological disorders- narcissistic behaviors, schizophrenia, dissociative disorders, paranoia, PTSD, anxiety, bipolar disorder, MS, epilepsy, seizures, ADD, ADHD, brain and spinal cord issues, brain lesions, poor balance. 

Parasites can also live in the sinus cavities (Ascaris Lumbricoides-nematode roundworms) causing nasal discharge, nasal obstructions, facial pain, headaches, allergies, and chronically swollen tonsils. The most common parasitic symptoms are in the gastrointestinal tract causing diarrhea, slow bowel movements, stomach upset, slow digestion, gas bloating, food intolerances.  

Roundworm Symptoms: allergies, sinus issues, anemia, asthma, digestive disturbance, grinding teeth at night, intestinal gas, restlessness, lymphatic issues, snoring and weight gain. Calcium deficiency often accompanies roundworm infestation.  

Flatworm Symptoms: feeling toxic, dizzy, foggy thinking, hunger pains, poor digestion, allergies, bloating, high and/or low blood sugar, gas, jaundice, mineral imbalance, thyroid imbalance, disturbed sleep and teeth-grinding. Infections from tapeworms usually occur from ingesting undercooked or raw meat or from contaminated food, water, soil, or hand to mouth contact. 

Blood Flukes Symptoms: blood clots, high blood pressure, stroke, The bone marrow may also be affected. Blood flukes take up amino acids, especially arginine, which may cause a protein imbalance. 

Fish Flukes Symptoms:  skin issues, liver and intestinal disturbances including feelings of pressure and gas.

Intestinal Flukes Symptoms: sinuses, mucus, indigestion, intestinal problems, prostate problems, issues associated with dioxin poisoning. 

Liver Flukes Symptoms: Liver disorders, pain near the liver. 

Lung Flukes: anemia, dry cough, coughs that persist, shortness of breath, impaired breathing, redness in the whites of the eyes. Lung flukes may cause oxygen starvation to the entire blood system. Keep in mind that weakened lungs may lead to other lung illnesses such as repeated flu, pneumonia, and fungal infections. 

Lymph Flukes Symptoms: lymph disorders, including breast cancer, lymphoma and leukemia. 

Pancreatic Flukes Symptoms: autism, sugar imbalances – both low and high, candida overgrowth in the liver, and pancreatic disorders of any kind.

 

Parasites and Testing 

Why lab stool parasite testing is unreliable & inaccurate: 

  1. Parasites have a self-dissolving mechanism. They can excrete an enzyme that makes them dissolve in about 24 hours after being purged from the body/die. 
  2. The skill level of the individual examining the microscopic specimen is critical to accurate results. Parasite ova can be easily missed if the sample is not examined thoroughly, & false positive results can occur because other substances – pollen, insect ova, & plants can look similar to parasites & their ova. 
  3. Parasites live throughout the body, not just the colon. They love living in the brain, sinuses, lungs, pancreas, joints and many other organs. This is just one more reason why parasite stool testing is an unreliable source to confirm if you have parasites. 

 

 

A Few Fun Facts about Parasites 

If you’ve ever had a parasitic infection, you know there is nothing fun about them! But here are a few interesting facts: 

  • Worms can grow more than 3 feet long.
  • Hookworm transmission transmitted by walking barefoot on contaminated soil.
  • One can get roundworms and whipworms by ingesting parasite eggs, through uncooked food.
  • 200 roundworms are considered a moderate infection in a child’s intestines. Each worm can be 8-12 inches long.
  • Adult worm parasites can live up to 30 years inside the human body!
  • Malaria causes the most deaths globally (400,00 per year)
  • Parasites can lump together in the human body in balls and appear as cancer tumors.
  • The largest recorded human parasite extracted to date is 37 feet long!!
  • Toxoplasma gondii is linked to ADD, schizophrenia, suicidal behaviors.
  • Follicle mites can live directly on the human body. Up to four mites can attach to one hair follicle.
  • The second cause of blindness in the world is caused by a parasitic worm called Onchocerca Volvulus.
  • Hookworm infection is linked to low blood count.
  • The Naegleria Fowleri amoeba is responsible for brain inflammation/meningitis.
  • Approximately 50 million children in the US have a parasitic infection.
  • Chagas is a parasitic infection considered to be “the new AIDS.”
  • A square foot of a single carpet houses about 10,000 dust mites.
  • Parasites multiply quickly. They can have their own parasites, and they can have even more parasites!

 

In part two of this series, I will dive into the ways we can test for parasites, how to detox them from our systems, and the holistic nutritional and lifestyle steps we can take to treat and prevent future infections.  

 

Read Part 2 

 

By Janelle Bertler, Traditional Naturopathic Practitioner 

 

In our healing journeys, the ghost of emotional trauma often plays a significant role. The adage, “No one gets out of childhood without traumas,” resonates profoundly as a universal truth. Trauma, however, is not solely confined to the grand, dramatic events that come to mind. While abuse, betrayal, illness, loss, and abrupt life changes are often seen as the monumental “big T” traumas, the canvas of our lives is also painted with “little t” traumas. These seemingly smaller incidents hold the power to create emotional distress, triggering a spectrum of negative emotions that disrupt our equilibrium. Regardless of their magnitude, these traumas demand attention and processing for healing to seed deep within the body!

Here at Longevity, sometimes we see people stay so focused on their physical symptoms (usually subconsciously) as an avoidance to feeling emotional pain. It’s a defense mechanism that may provide temporary respite but ultimately hinders the deeper healing process. Emotional traumas, like storms, can leave lasting imprints on our hearts and minds, even translating into tangible physical manifestations. The pain trauma brings might seem insurmountable, but just as a wound heals with time, so too can emotional scars. Healing from emotional traumas is a deeply personal journey that requires patience, self-compassion, the right mindset and rolling with the emotional flow of this physical life. The following steps unveil a path toward healing from emotional traumas, propelling us towards a state of wholeness and peace.

 

Awareness

Awareness is the gateway toward healing. It’s the beginning of the path forward, out of the shadows of pain. Awareness creates the space needed for individuals to process their experiences, emotions, and memories. The process of validating the pain and the various emotions that accompany trauma is the foundation upon which recovery builds. Unprocessed emotions are wounds that remain hidden and fester below the surface, therefore, let the emotions flow. Give yourself permission to grieve, be angry, feel sad, etc., without attaching a narrative, judgment, or meaning. You may find it easiest to start with 15 minutes of manageable increments per day. Set a timer. When it goes off, promise your body you will show up again tomorrow! This process is a necessary part of integrating the trauma into one’s life story and finding meaning in the midst of pain. Awareness makes way for empowerment. It gives agency over the healing journey. You have control over your emotions, thoughts, and behaviors which allows for rebuilding a sense of self, regaining a sense of control, finding the strength to move forward and the resiliency to feel hope again.

 

Support Networks

Recognizing the need for help and seeking support is an integral part of the healing process. You don’t have to go through the healing journey alone. Reach out to friends, loved ones, support groups or therapists, who can offer guidance and understanding. Surround yourself with a support network who genuinely cares for your well-being and has your back. Not any one person can be all things, so diversify. Your support network can be immensely helpful during the healing process by providing validation, comfort, and a sense of belonging. Therapy can be useful in its ability to shine a light on your coping mechanisms, give you insights into your trauma, and provide you with tools to navigate healing. Therapists are excellent at providing understanding of how your formative years and specific traumas are still impacting your life. The beauty of support networks is that it can go both ways. When they need support, you can be there for them. 

 

Practice Forgiveness

Forgiveness is not about condoning harmful actions or letting others off the hook; it’s about releasing the heavy burden of resentment from your own heart. Forgiving doesn’t mean forgetting; it means freeing yourself from the chains of bitterness. Holding onto grudges, anger and resentment only perpetuates the cycle of pain. Forgiveness can begin by tapping into empathy and allowing release. It is a process that’s unique to each individual and may take time. Remember to incorporate self-forgiveness in the process as well. Research on forgiveness shows improved mental health, less anxiety/depression, lower blood pressure, a stronger immune system, improved heart health, improved self-esteem and healthier relationships. All well worth the time invested.

 

Reflection

Reflective practice allows us to observe our own thoughts and feelings. Most times our thoughts and feelings go unobserved, creating repetitive negative patterns. Developing the ability to slow down, creates space for observation allowing for gaining understanding, identifying patterns and triggers, transforming actions, and finding forward momentum. Self-reflection can lead to profound insights and safeguard against inadvertently re-traumatizing yourself or others. As you pen down your traumatic experiences, I challenge you to rewrite your story from a place of empowerment – extract lessons, both positive and challenging, that the experience offered. How does your prior experience reverberate in your life now? Just remember to not get lost in the mind. Bring it into action. How do you want to adapt? How are you going to bounce back? How are you going to interact with those around you, creating a different pattern moving forward? What can you let go of? Consistent self-reflection nurtures accountability, fostering personal growth that ripples outward, benefiting not only you but those who share your journey. Through reflection, you build a bridge between past wounds and present healing, fostering resilience and empowerment.

 

Mindset 

Cultivating a resilient mindset is akin to tending to the garden of your thoughts, carefully nurturing the beliefs that shape your reality. Marisa Peer explains, “a belief is just a thought that plays over and over,” so begin to choose your thoughts wisely. Mindset influences how you think, feel, and behave in every given situation. Therefore, by growing a resilient mindset we harness our inner strength, cushioning ourselves from the effects of daily stressors. The mindset that fosters resilience begins with the following traits: optimism, positive self-talk, purpose, adaptability, emotional intelligence, and an ability to work through problems. All these traits can be grown! Srikumar Roa talks about situations as neither good nor bad. He recommends holding the perspective of “who knows, we will see.” I challenge you to invite a sense of curiosity, looking for the silver lining, even if all you can see right now are dark clouds. Resilience won’t make your problems go away — but resilience can give you the ability to see past them, allowing for satisfaction, peace, and enjoyment in life with a better ability to manage stress and adversity. If we apply the mind’s healing power, we can heal not only our mental and emotional afflictions but physical problems too.

 

Authenticity

The journey towards authenticity dances hand in hand with self-discovery and self-compassion. Authenticity is particularly pivotal for trauma survivors, as it involves shedding the protective facades and embracing one’s true self. Authenticity requests vulnerability and as vulnerability flourishes it begins to dismantle self-defensive behaviors which were constructed in response to trauma. An authentic person is someone who exudes genuineness, honesty, and comfort in their own skin, unburdened by the need for external acceptance. It’s a key that unlocks one’s true potential and is associated with higher self-esteem, psychological well-being, and genuine happiness. Authenticity forms the foundation for relationships, enabling individuals to be appreciated for their true selves. The journey of inviting vulnerability and becoming more authentic to you, is a journey that empowers healing, self-connection, and the ability to communicate needs with clarity. This ultimately leads to a life where one can unabashedly be themselves, embraced and valued for all their unique thoughts, beliefs, emotional needs, and desires. Embrace the journey of owning the masterpiece that is you – every facet and hue.

 

Set Boundaries

Boundaries are like the guardians of our emotional and psychological well-being, and they play a pivotal role in the healing journey from trauma. When individuals establish clear and healthy boundaries, they create a safe space where they can protect themselves from potential triggers and emotional distress. This safety provides a foundation for healing, allowing survivors to regain a sense of control over their lives and their personal space. Boundaries act as a buffer against re-traumatization, preventing others from crossing lines that might evoke painful memories or emotions. Moreover, they enable trauma survivors to define their needs and communicate them effectively, fostering a sense of agency and empowerment. In essence, boundaries are the scaffolding upon which the process of healing can be built, helping individuals navigate the path towards recovery with greater resilience and self-assuredness.

 

Lifestyle Support 

Lifestyle can either support or hinder the emotional healing process. Let’s highlight the categories to pay attention to in your daily life.

  1. Self-Care Practices: Exercise, Stretch, Yoga, Tai Chi, Meditation, Deep Breathing, and Tapping all assist in managing stress, reducing anxiety, and supports staying grounded.
  2. Nutrition: A nutrient-rich diet that nourishes the body supports the brain with the necessary fuel to function normally, stabilize mood and improve energy levels. 
  3. Sleep: Quality sleep is vital for the processing of traumas and supports emotional regulation. Create a restful sleep environment. 
  4. Physical Activity: Regular exercise has been proven to reduce anxiety, depression, and can assist in releasing pent up energy. It releases the feel-good hormone called endorphins, supporting elevated mood. 
  5. Creativity & Expression: Art, writing, and music are excellent therapeutics supports that can assist in processing of emotions. 

 

Conclusion

Healing from emotional traumas is a journey of reclaiming ourselves. It requires compassion, patience, and consistent effort. Its ultimate goal is to lighten the heart, leading to a state of wholeness and an internal sense of peace. Just as a garden requires time to bloom after a storm, so too does the soul in the process of healing. This transformation of pain into wisdom, scars into stories, and darkness into newfound serenity is a testament to human resilience. It’s important to acknowledge that healing is not a linear path; there will be setbacks and challenges along the way. Yet, each small step forward is a cause for celebration, honoring the strength within. With the right support system, self-care regimen, and a willingness to confront past pain, one can turn trauma into an opportunity for personal growth.

 

Homeopathic & Nutritional Supports

Longevity’s Nutrition Shop has a wide range of support for emotional healing.

  • Solace Milleu Homeopathic
  • Grief Relief Herbal
  • Relief-Tone Homeopathic
  • Relax-Tone Homeopathic
  • Calm Five Homeopathic
  • St. John’s Wort
  • Happy Saffron
  • Zen
  • Everyday Stress Relief 
  • Bach flowers
  • And a whole bunch more

Feel free to ask your practitioner which product will be supportive to you and your situation.

 

Further Resources

Healing What’s Hidden: Practical Steps to Overcoming Trauma by Evan & Jenny Owens

Breaking the Habit of Being Yourself by Joe Dispenza

It Didn’t Start with You by Mark Wolynn

I Am Enough by Marisa Peer

Tell Yourself a Better Lie by Marisa Peer

The Tapping Solution: A Revolutionary System for Stress Free Living by Nick Ortner

Making Sense of Men by Alison Armstrong

Understanding Women: Unlock the Mystery by Alison Armstrong

The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel van der Kolk, MD

Getting Past Your Past by Francine Sharpiro PhD

 

By Mariela Amiri, Traditional Naturopath & Patient Coordinator

 

What are EMFs?

Electromagnetic Fields or EMFs are invisible fields created by the charges and currents of electrical entities. Much like gravity, these fields are invisible to the naked eye, yet have a great negative impact on our bodies. Natural EMFs are present everywhere in the environment, even on the cellular level. They are created by objects as small as atoms, electrons and even our own nerves; to objects as large as the sun and the planets that rotate around it. Visible evidence of EMFs occurs when the build up of electricity in the environment creates lightning or when the earth’s magnetic field causes a compass needle to point north. 

As the technological revolution continues, there has been a significant increase in the number and diversity of electromagnetic field sources, EMFs. Man-made EMFs are referred to as Dirty Electricity or Electromagnetic Radiation, these types of EMFs are harmful to the human body. For most people, exposure to EMFs occurs on a daily basis, as these fields are everywhere. Some common items that produce these EMFs include cellular phones, microwave ovens, electronic appliances, gaming systems, computers, laptops, iPods, iWatches, FitBits, MP3 players, electronic grids and even indoor lightning. 

EMFs exist on a spectrum and it depends on its wavelength and frequency. There are two types of electromagnetic fields, one has the capacity to break chemical bonds and the other does not.  

Higher Frequency EMFs/Ionizing are EMFs which include X-Rays, Gamma Rays, ultraviolet rays. These EMFs are ionizing radiation that can cause damage to cells and DNA. Some high doses of ionizing radiation can cause immediate damage such as burns, hair loss, organ damage, damage to bone marrow and damage to an unborn fetus. These types of damage can also cause long term effects with no immediate symptoms. Low-Mid Frequency EMFs/Non Ionizing EMFs include static fields, magnetic fields from electrical power lines and appliances, radio waves, and visible light. 

 

How do EMFs affect our body?

EMFs affect the intra-cellular communication in the body, causing our cells to die off faster than they can be regenerated, toxins collect in our bodies which inhibits the correct function of our cells and this is when health issues arise. 

Electromagnetic hypersensitivity is the term used for a variety of non-specific symptoms due to exposure to EMFs. Some people can be sensitive to both types of EMs.The symptoms most commonly experienced are dermatological symptoms such as redness, tingling and burning sensations as well as neurological symptoms such as dizziness, headaches/migraines,difficulty concentrating, insomnia/circadian imbalance, neuropathy, as well as  depression. Additionally other symptoms include  low libido and digestive disturbances are just a few of these bothersome symptoms.

 

How do I protect myself from EMFs?

Start with your sleeping environment. While you are sleeping, your body’s parasympathetic system works on restoring you at cellular level. Take a look at your sleeping environment and make sure that it is free from radiation emitting devices such as cellphones, Alexas, electric blankets, laptops etc. We recommend that these devices, particularly when they are plugged into the wall, are moved at least 5 feet away from your body. Additionally, it is recommended to remove any iWatches and Fitbits before going to sleep. You might also consider putting your home’s WiFi internet router on a timer so that it shuts down at night. 

We recommend investing in products that transform hazardous EMFs into fields of protection around you. House shields, meter shields, cell phone and laptop shields, EMF blocking jewelry are excellent ideas to keep you safe from harmful radiation.  Home shields typically plug into an electric outlet and protect 2,500 square feet of your home. Cell phone/ laptop shields can be placed directly on the object for protection, and will last about 2 years.

Check out our Smart 5G Shield, designed to block radiation from common sources such as 4G and 5G cell phones, tablets and laptops. These shields are powered by a patent pending solar cell device that increases effectiveness to divert the high intensity frequencies from cell towers that harm human cells. Call our nutrition shop for more information 770-642-4646.

 

 

By Carrie Rutledge, Longevity Patient Coordinator 

Who are the largest consumers of saturated fat in the world? It may surprise you to know that Spain, France, and most European countries are some of the biggest consumers of dietary saturated fats[1]; yet are leading in health outcomes.  In reference to the 2019 global report on healthiest countries in the world based on a range of factors (the United States didn’t make the top 20), Spain is in first place, with Italy right behind and France at number 12 [2].

It’s important to understand that European countries currently ban several types of pesticides and artificial ingredients; France, Italy and Spain also cook their foods with olive oil, butter, and animal fats. In fact, a roux in France is commonly made with butter, bacon drippings or lard. The most common cooking oil for Americans is vegetable oil. Soybean, canola, safflower, sunflower, corn, rice bran, and grape seed oil have been spouted as “healthy” but may be causing Americans to suffer from inflammation including high rates of autoimmune disease. Moreover, it is nearly impossible to dine out in America without consuming these oils.

Longevity in the United States has not improved much over the last few centuries. In fact, if you look back at the signers of the Declaration of Independence, 23 out of 56 lived past their seventies and 35 of them lived into their sixties. This was in 1776, before plumbing, infrastructure, antibiotics, and the numerous medical interventions we have today. One would assume with all these interventions that Americans would be some of the healthiest people on the planet. So, the question remains why are Americans still suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases including high rates of autoimmune disease? Could it be the highly processed, industrialized vegetable oils we are ingesting daily?

 

The History Behind Vegetable Oil  

Americans slowly began introducing vegetable oils for cooking in the early 1900s, and we began replacing animal fats for cooking in the 1980s. In 1990 McDonalds replaced beef tallow with 100% vegetable oil. Today, most restaurants will use highly refined vegetable oil for cooking and frying.

The refining process of vegetable oils includes bleaching, degumming, and deodorizing to make these oils edible[3]. Once these oils are bottled and shelved, they still contain many inflammatory and toxic components. A study done by the Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society, showed that cold-pressed vegetable oils contain pesticides, PBDEs, PCBs, and PAHs.  All are regarded as hazardous chemical contaminants.[4]

Moreover, Global Data, found that the United States and the United Kingdom have a higher prevalence of inflammatory autoimmune diseases compared to other countries.[5] The use of vegetable oils in America, specifically soybean and canola oil, may be contributing to the rise in the various inflammatory conditions we see today. Specifically, the rise in auto-immune disease and allergic conditions.

 

The Necessity of Essential Fatty Acids

 It’s important to understand that the human body requires Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs) to function. EFAs are Polyunsaturated Omega 6 (Linoleic Acid and Arachidonic Acid) and Omega 3 fatty acids (EPA, DHA and ALA (Alpha-linolenic acid)) that must be acquired from the diet because the human body cannot make them on their own. While scientists say that EPA and DHA are not essential because the human body can convert ALA into EPA and DHA, the conversion rate is low to none for most individuals. EFAs are precursors to eicosanoids which are cell signaling molecules responsible for building cell membranes, regulating many inflammatory processes and vasodilation. [6]

Omega 3 fatty acids are anti-inflammatory and are the primary component of neurons in the brain and extremely important for fetal and infant brain development. Sources of Omega 3 fatty acids EPA and DHA are human milk, oysters, and fish. Sources of Omega 3 Alpha-linolenic acid are flaxseed, wheat germ, walnuts, and chia seeds. Omega 3 also comes from canola oil in the form of Alpha-linolenic acid; however, it is highly processed, oxidizes easily and the conversion rate is very low.[7] Omega 6 fatty acids are pro-inflammatory meaning they are required for the inflammatory response. Omega 6 linoleic acid and Arachidonic acid sources come from most vegetable oils including soybean oil and sunflower oil, poultry fat, meat, eggs, nuts, and seeds.

The problem we are seeing in the United States today is an imbalance of these essential fatty acids. History shows that 100 years ago humans had a ratio of around 4:1 in favor of omega-6 fatty acids. Today, due to the overuse of industrial seed oils, nut milks, nut butters and the decreased consumption of seafood, many Americans have a ratio of 20:1 or higher. [8]

 

Maintaining a low Omega 6 to Omega 3 ratio in Relation to Autoimmune Conditions

Studies are showing that maintaining a lower omega 6: omega 3 ratio at a level of 4:1 is effective in reducing inflammation; whereas a higher ratio is associated with increased inflammation, allergies and autoimmune disease.8 Scientists estimate that our ancestors in the Paleolithic era consumed anywhere from 660mg to 14,250mg of omega 3 fatty acids per day. Today, the decreased consumption of marine omega-3 and an increase in the consumption of omega-6 through industrial seed oils which contain a ratio of 60:1; we have seen a dramatic increase in pro-inflammatory autoimmune conditions such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, Crohn’s Disease, asthma, and allergies.8,10

Clinical studies are showing that Omega-3 fatty acids are able to reduce inflammation and may improve symptoms in individuals with Rheumatoid Arthritis, a condition in which the immune system attacks the lining of joints causing inflammation and pain. In one study composed of 68 Rheumatoid Arthritis patients, 34 were put on an anti-inflammatory diet with less than 90mg/day of arachidonic acid (omega-6), the other group followed a standard American diet and patients in both studies were given placebos or fish oil capsules. The study showed that those who had a diet low in arachidonic acid, supplemented with fish oil and followed an anti-inflammatory diet saw a significant decrease in pain and inflammation. [9]

Furthermore, Crohn’s patients also saw a decrease in inflammation when lowering omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. The primary mechanism for which Omega-6 fatty acids contribute to the inflammatory response in a Crohn’s patient is through the activation of Nuclear Factor-Kappa Beta (NF-kB), a transcription factor that promotes inflammation. The cells and macrophages of Crohn’s patients have an increase of TNF-alpha and Interleukin-1, which may promote further activation of NF-kB. Studies show that oxidative stress is increased in Crohn’s cells exposed to omega-6 (linoleic) fatty acids. The data from the study implies that dietary restriction of Omega-6 fatty acids in the form of oxidized vegetable oils along with arachidonic acid inhibitors while increasing antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids, may provide relief for Crohn’s patients.8,[10]

Likewise, studies are showing the increased consumption of oxidized omega-6 fatty acids are correlated with an increase in allergies such as asthma and eczema because alpha-linoleic acid and linoleic acid compete for the same enzymes. Moreover, the increased intake of omega-6 fatty acids, provide high amounts of linoleic acid, which competes with EPA and DHA in the membrane of the cell. A low intake of omega-3 fatty acids will lead to an increase in omega-6 fatty acids and a large production of inflammatory cytokines and recruitment of mast cells. Additionally, Omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) are shown to reduce the breakdown of Arachidonic acid into pro-inflammatory compounds while increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Because allergies are characterized by a chronic inflammatory state, the reduction of omega-6 fatty acids and increase in omega-3 fatty acids, may help the body to heal chronic inflammatory conditions.8,[11]    

 

 Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation in Pregnancy Outcomes

Fish Oil Supplements in Pregnancy Reduce Asthma Risk in Offspring

Clinical studies are showing that the consumption or supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in pregnancy may reduce allergic diseases in offspring. In one randomized placebo-controlled study, 154 women who were affected by allergies or had previous children with allergies, were given 2.7 grams of Omega-3 fatty acids.  They supplemented with EPA and DHA at 25 weeks gestation until 3-4 months of breastfeeding. The results showed that the risk of food allergy decreased by over seven-fold and the risk of food related eczema decreased by three-fold.8,12 Likewise, the observational data showed that mothers who didn’t eat fish during pregnancy had an increased risk of having a child with asthma. In fact, a low intake of ALA and omega-3 fatty acids coincided with a 66% increase in offspring with asthma. 8,13

Additionally, a review of 10 cohort studies and 5 randomized controlled trials showed that women who consume or supplement high amounts of omega-3 fatty acids may be taking the first step in preventing allergic disease in future generations. In fact, more than 70% of observational studies found a significant decrease of inflammatory allergic conditions in offspring with an increased consumption of fish or omega-3 supplementation during pregnancy. Ensuring an optimal omega 6 to Omega 3 ratio before the fetal immune system develops, may be an important step in preventing allergic diseases in children.8,12  

 

How to Safely Consume Omega 6 and Omega 3 Fatty Acids

 Omega-6 fatty acids are essential to the diet and serve to promote the inflammatory response in the human body, but we should be getting them from healthy whole-food sources instead of highly processed oils. By eating pastured meats, eggs, olive oil, nuts and seeds you can be assured that you are getting enough omega-6 fatty acids. Lowering the ratio can be easily done by enjoying these foods daily and by increasing the amount of seafood in the diet. While consuming walnuts, chia, and flaxseed oil will increase the ALA in the diet, the conversion rate to EPA and DHA is low; therefore, it is imperative to eat wild caught seafood such as salmon, sardines, shrimp, oysters, and anchovies while taking a quality fish oil or algae supplement. Omega-3 fatty acid supplements can be in the form of fish oil, krill, cod liver oil, and algae (for vegans or seafood allergies). 11

Additionally, the quality of seafood does matter as farm raised fish do not contain omega 3 fatty acids. Fish rely on their diet of algae to make EPA and DHA and farm raised seafood is often fed grains, soy, corn, and plant proteins making them high in omega-6 fatty acids.14 For this reason, it is crucial to purchase wild-caught fish as opposed to farm raised. 11,14

 

Summary 

 Without a doubt, Americans are lacking in their consumption of omega-3 fatty acids, and this results in a high omega 6: omega 3 ratio. Studies are showing the imbalance of these fatty acids may be contributing to the high rates of autoimmune disease in our country. Currently, the benefits of omega-3 supplementation are being studied for several inflammatory conditions including obesity, cancer, ADHD, Alzheimer’s, and depression. While studies show that supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids can reduce inflammatory autoimmune diseases overall, more research needs to be done. Some studies were observational or used questionable methods to substantiate evidence such as using lower doses of fish oil capsules which proved to be ineffective. The optimal ratio of omega 6: omega 3 is debatable, has not been clearly defined, and may be specific to the individual. Other limitations such as environmental and nutritional factors must also be considered when evaluating research.

 

References:

 

1)  https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/02/these-are-the-world-s-healthiest-nations/ 

 

2)     https://www.bmj.com/content/348/bmj.g2272 

 

3)     Gharby S. Refining Vegetable Oils: Chemical and Physical Refining. ScientificWorldJournal. 2022 Jan 11;2022:6627013. doi: 10.1155/2022/6627013. PMID: 35069038; PMCID: PMC8767382. 

 

4)     Gharby S. Refining Vegetable Oils: Chemical and Physical Refining. ScientificWorldJournal. 2022 Jan 11;2022:6627013. doi: 10.1155/2022/6627013. PMID: 35069038; PMCID: PMC8767382.

 

5)     GlobalData (2016). EpiCast Report: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) – Epidemiology Forecast To 2025, December 2016, GDHCER144-16

6)     Medicine, The National Academies. Dietary reference intakes for energy, carbohydrate, fiber, fat, fatty acids, cholesterol, protein and amino acids. J Am Diet Assoc. 2002 Nov;102(11):1621-30. doi: 10.1016/s0002-8223(02)90346-9. Erratum in: J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 May;103(5):563. PMID: 12449285.

 

7)     Gerster H. Can adults adequately convert alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) to eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3)? Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 1998;68(3):159-73. PMID: 9637947

 

8)     DiNicolantonio JJ, O’Keefe J. The Importance of Maintaining a Low Omega-6/Omega-3 Ratio for Reducing the Risk of Autoimmune Diseases, Asthma, and Allergies. Mo Med. 2021 Sep-Oct;118(5):453-459. PMID: 34658440; PMCID: PMC8504498

 

9)     Adam O, Beringer C, Kless T, Lemmen C, Adam A, Wiseman M, Adam P, Klimmek R, Forth W. Anti-inflammatory effects of a low arachidonic acid diet and fish oil in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatol Int. 2003 Jan;23(1):27-36. doi: 

10.1007/s00296-002-0234-7. Epub 2002 Sep 6. PMID: 12548439

 

10)   Alzoghaibi MA, Walsh SW, Willey A, et al. Linoleic acid induces interleukin-8 production by Crohn’s human intestinal smooth muscle cells via arachidonic acid metabolites. American journal of physiology Gastrointestinal and liver physiology. 2004;286:G528–37

 

11)   Lundeen KA, Sun B, Karlsson L, et al. Leukotriene B4 receptors BLT1 and BLT2: expression and function in human and murine mast cells. Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md: 1950) 2006;177:3439–47.

 

12)    Maslova E, Strom M, Oken E, et al. Fish intake during pregnancy and the risk of child asthma and allergic rhinitis – longitudinal evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort. The British journal of nutrition. 2013;110:1313–25.

 

13)   Lumia M, Luukkainen P, Tapanainen H, et al. Dietary fatty acid composition during pregnancy and the risk of asthma in the offspring. Pediatric allergy and immunology: official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.

 

14)   Sprague M, Dick JR, Tocher DR. Impact of sustainable feeds on omega-3 long-chain fatty acid levels in farmed Atlantic salmon, 2006-2015. Sci Rep 2016;6:21892. [PubMed abstract]

by Janelle Bertler, Traditional Naturopathic Practitioner

 

Little did I know that finding myself dating again in my 40’s would lead to a new found appreciation for men, yet this story isn’t about my dating experience. It’s about the many MANY amazing human beings that I have met along the dating journey. Couple this appreciation for men with a desire to assist everyone to show up as their best selves, and at that crossroad is where this series of articles was born. Let’s begin.  

It’s a “no-brainer” that men are important to society for their contributions to family, community, leadership, education, innovation and more. Now more than ever before in history, the state of the world is having an effect on everyone, and the stressors continue to compound! For any healthcare practitioner, whose goal is to support the physical health of any human being, they must look at supporting the mind, body and spirit. We know that the body is so intertwined and connected that if you affect one of these systems, it in turn affects the others. 

 

Here are some statistics in regards to the physical-mental health connection: 

  • Men with depression have a 30% higher risk for developing heart disease.
  • Men with mental health disorders are at a higher risk of developing cancer and are more likely to die from the disease.
  • Men with mental health issues are more likely to struggle with substance abuse. Men with substance abuse are at a higher risk of developing liver disease, heart disease, and cancer.
  • Men with mental health conditions are more likely to experience chronic pain.
  • Men with mental health disorders are more likely to experience sleep problems, which can lead to an increased risk of other chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity. 
  • Men with depression have a 60% higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared to men without.
  • Men with mental health conditions are more likely to be obese, which can lead to a variety of physical health problems, including heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure. 
  • According to the World Health Organization suicide rates among men are about 3x’s higher than women.

 

Mental health has a significant impact on men’s physical health. This highlights the importance of addressing mental health concerns as a key part of overall health and well-being. It is true that men may be less likely to seek help for mental health issues. They are more likely to cope with mental health issues on their own, possibly due to social/ cultural norms that stigmatize mental health as a sign of weakness and vulnerability. Let’s dive into what men can do to support a healthy mental wellbeing!

We all know we should eat right, sleep well, exercise, blah, blah, blah. I’d like to share with you the “why” and some other areas that you may want to incorporate into your life. 

  1. Healthy eating reduces inflammation and reduces stress. It supports a healthy gut, deeper healing sleep, improves mood and increases energy.
  2. Prioritizing sleep has all the benefits of eating healthy, as well as assisting cognitive function, reducing irritability and increasing healthy emotional regulation. 
  3. Exercise not only improves mental health, but it also reduces the risk of chronic disease, improves sleep and relieves stress. Don’t forget about weight-lifting exercises. Muscle mass is important for supporting healthy testosterone levels, proper glucose control, bone health and improved self-image. 
  4. Maintain healthy relationships – Find your balance between family connections, friends and social groups. Loneliness and social isolation has been linked to an increased risk in depression, cardiovascular disease and decreased longevity. Males thrive on having friendships with other males, someone to talk to when times feel tough, and I’m not just talking about the superficial “sports” buddy. I’m talking about meaningful deep friendships. Finding friends as an adult might be easier by using a “finding friends” app or by joining groups that fit your favorite activities. A “gym buddy” might be a great way to fill multiple needs. 
  5. Take time for activities that bring joy and relaxation. It is important to find out what you need and enjoy. This will be different for every person and it may take trial and error to discover what works best. Carving out a little time in your life to feel elevated emotions can be very powerful, and we all need to find a little more relaxation to balance out our very busy lives.    
  6. Practice mindfulness in the way that works for you! This can take multiple forms: yoga, meditate, practice breathing exercises and/or try legs up the wall. There are all types of apps that can assist in this category; and remember to fill your spiritual needs as well.
  7. Limit screen time. Not only does blue light suppress melatonin making it harder to fall asleep, but devices keep your brain active and alert. Reducing screen time allows the brain to slow down and focus without distractions. Overtime this increases the ability to regulate emotions. Not to mention that media can have either a beneficial or negative effect depending upon what you choose to consume. 
  8. Serve others! Sometimes it takes getting out of our daily life and personal needs by putting attention on supporting others to get us out of the depths of mental health struggles. Volunteer your time. You might be amazed at how connecting in this way feeds the soul.
  9. Detoxify the body! By reducing the toxin load of the inner terrain, your Naturopath can assist you in feeling your best. 

 

It is when we feel our best that we have more “bandwidth” to deal with the everyday stressors of life. Put your own oxygen mask on first. Fill your own cup first. Take time for self-care! That way you are able to choose how you interact with those around you each and every day. Imagine a world where everyone has grace for everyone around them and can gently respond with kindness because everyone feels their best. That is the world I want to live in. Please join me in creating this world by caring for yourself and sharing this information with all the men that are important in your life. If you find yourself needing support in feeling your best, we are here to help! 

 

By Mariela Amiri, Traditional Naturopath & Patient Coordinator 

A coffee enema is a type of colon cleanse used in alternative medicine. During the procedure, a mixture of brewed, caffeinated coffee and water is inserted into the colon through the rectum. 

The purpose of coffee enemas is to promote the removal of pathogens and free radicals from the blood and decrease the toxic load on the liver. They can help reduce the burden on a system that is being bombarded with the stress and toxins of everyday life.

The Benefits of Coffee Enemas: 

  • Boosts immunity
  • Increase energy
  • Stops yeast overgrowth
  • Supports detoxification in people with autoimmune diseases and cancer
  • Removes parasites from the digestive tract
  • Removes heavy metals from the body
  • Relieves symptoms of depression

The coffee solution is not held in the liver. In fact, it’s held in the colon. The vessels in the lower part of the descending colon and rectum carry the solution to the liver. The potent compounds in coffee are absorbed by the hemorrhoidal and mesenteric veins that route to the liver.

The coffee enema itself does not produce bile. The coffee does cause some stimulation of the liver to produce bile, but it’s the potent compounds including caffeine, theobromine and theophylline that dilate blood vessels, bile ducts and relax smooth muscles, increasing the flow of bile.

Electrolytes are lost during evacuation, and therefore coffee enemas should always be balanced by juice or minerals. The body does not become dependent on coffee enemas to have a bowel movement.

A variety of coffee is appropriate for use, ranging from gold, green and white, to light and medium roasts. Dark roasts are not appropriate because the potent compounds have been roasted out. Gold, green or white beans are very potent, with light to medium roasts typically well-tolerated by most. If you are new to coffee enemas, green, gold or white beans may not be best to start with. Instead, start with a medium or light roast. Coffee must be organic and we recommend fair-trade, sustainable coffee

 

Coffee Enemas Are Not Recommended for People with the Following Health Concerns: 

  • Currently undergoing chemotherapy
  • Currently in renal, cardiac or respiratory failure
  • Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative Colitis or other conditions with bleeding and/or ulceration in the digestive tract
  • Ileostomy (no colon)
  • Those with Hypertension and/or tachycardia
  • Pregnant women (consult with your primary physician or Gerson Practitioner)
  • Those experiencing acute or chronic diarrhea (until investigated by a physician)
  • First 6-8 weeks post-surgery (always check with your primary physician)

How to Perform a Coffee Enema:

To perform a coffee enema at home, you need to purchase an enema kit along with organic coffee. Below you’ll find directions for how to make a coffee enema recipe.

  • Enema kits can be found in certain health food or drug stores, and definitely online. There are several types available. No matter the type you use, look for one that has a tube and nozzle attached to either a bucket or bag that hangs above you when you lie down.
  • After choosing a enema kit, you need to purchase coffee beans. You want to purchase only certified organic coffee and regular (not decaf) beans that are free from all chemical sprays — this is important considering the quality of the coffee determines how effective the detoxification process will be.
  • Best to do one immediately after having a bowel movement if possible, which makes it more comfortable, effective and easier to retain for longer. You can also do an enema even if you haven’t recently had a bowel movement (for example, if you’re constipated), but many people like to perform enemas in the morning directly after going to the bathroom.
  • Some practitioners recommend taking an activated carbon charcoal binder before and after a coffee enema to help bind to toxins released from the bile duct so they can be eliminated from the body. 
  • It’s recommended to do an enema about once a week. 

A step-by-step guide for administering a coffee enema safely:

  1. Brew your coffee. Filtered water is highly recommended by most experts and might offer fewer risks than tap water (which contain traces of minerals or chemicals). Add 1-3 tablespoons of organic coffee beans to your pot along with 3-4 cups of filtered water. Then bring to a boil and let simmer for 15 minutes.
  2. Let the mixture cool down to a little warmer than room temperature (70-85 degrees)  once it’s boiled for about 15 minutes. It’s important to allow the mixture to cool because there’s a higher risk for injury and side effects when a solution that is too hot.
  3. You’re now ready to perform your enema, so choose a location that’s comfortable where you can lie down for about 15 minutes, such as the bathroom floor with some towels. Wherever you choose to be, take your enema kit and place the bucket or bag at least 1 meter above you and the ground. So if you’re lying on the floor, you might try hanging the bucket or bag on a towel rack, shower rail, etc. This helps gravity push the coffee liquid down faster so it’s better able to enter your digestive tract and do its job.
  4. Pour your coffee liquid into the enema bag or bucket and hold the tube and nozzle shut. Locate the lever on the tube and nozzle that helps you stop and start the flow of the enema. Before beginning, make sure the valve is shut so no liquid escapes. Use a lubricant such as coconut oil to coat the tip of the enema nozzle, which will make it easier to insert into your rectum without being uncomfortable. Lay on your left side.
  5. Use the valve that helps you to start the flow of coffee and keep the liquid slowly entering your rectum through the nozzle until the bag or bucket is emptied. Take your time and squeeze in so the liquid doesn’t escape as much as possible. Sit however you are most comfortable. That helps you keep the coffee inside of you for about 12 to 15 minutes — 15 minutes is the max time that you need to effectively cleanse your system, so at this point you can stop holding in and can go to the bathroom.

Recommended Supplies: